Monday, September 26, 2011

A Band Apart

Bande à part is a 1964 Nouvelle vague film directed by Jean-Luc Godard. It was released as Band of Outsiders in North America; its French title derives from the phrase faire bande à part, which means "to do something apart from the group."

The film is an adaptation of the novel Fools' Gold (Doubleday Crime Club, 1958) by American author Dolores Hitchens (1907–1973).

The film belongs to the French New Wave movement. Godard described it as "Alice in Wonderland meets Franz Kafka".

Bande à part is often considered one of Godard's most accessible films; Amy Taubin of the Village Voice called it "a Godard film for people who don't much care for Godard". Its accessibility has endeared the film to a broader audience. For example, it was the only Godard film selected for Time Magazine's All-TIME 100 movies.

Noted critic Pauline Kael described Bande à part as "a reverie of a gangster movie" and "perhaps Godard's most delicately charming film".

Ranked #79 in Empire magazines "The 100 Best Films Of World Cinema" in 2010.

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